Seven Essential Post-Surgery Tips for Weight Loss Success

Seven Essential Post-Surgery Tips for Weight Loss Success
Seven Essential Post-Surgery Tips for Weight Loss Success

Ever feel like weight loss is the biggest challenge you’ve ever faced? It can be, since the person we are up against ourselves. During any challenge in life it is important to prepare for what can sometimes feel too hard, by putting techniques in place to make post-surgery weight loss that little bit easier.

 <p>Ever feel like weight loss is the biggest challenge you’ve ever faced? It can be, since the person we are up against ourselves. During any challenge in life it is important to prepare for what can sometimes feel too hard, by putting techniques in place to make post-surgery weight loss that little bit easier.</p>
<p><strong>1. Mini-wins</strong></p>
<p>Setting smaller goals inside big goals gives greater motivation to move forward. Losing 100kg may seem unattainable, but making your goals short-term and dividing into smaller weight-loss chunks means that you have the potential to achieve something every seven days. Fitting into size 14 jeans might seem scary as a size 30, but every size drop is a win! You’ve got to crawl before you can walk. Be kind to yourself, and pat yourself on the back at every mini-win, making big wins feel that much closer.</p>
<p><strong>2. The Power of Protein</strong></p>
<p>High protein intake after surgery is critical, as it helps with muscle growth, restoration and feeling satisfied at mealtimes. Your body has a lot of healing to do after surgery, so to support this process, it is important to add more protein every day to help rebuild muscle tissue. Some examples are lean fish such as tuna, egg whites and non-fat yoghurt. Protein shakes or supplements may also be advised by your dietitian, to ensure you are getting adequate levels of protein. Just be aware that high-protein products might also be high-fat or high-carbohydrate. Always opt for low-sugar or low-fat options. Protein is priority!</p>
<p> <strong>3. Hydration</strong></p>
<p>Water is the number one nutrient for the body, aiding in brain function, muscle repair, immune support and everything in between. Post-op, it is common for some patients to feel dehydrated and lethargic from lack of water, as your stomach can’t hold as much fluid as it once could. Make your water bottle your new best friend, and ensure it never leaves your side. Small sips throughout the day can help keep your hydration levels up.</p>
<p> <strong>4. Care for yourself in other ways</strong></p>
<p>Sometimes we rely too heavily on food and drinks to be our support or reward system. Finding other ways to feel good about ourselves is a great way to stop depending on food for emotional support. Do something that makes you feel good, whether it be a mani-pedi after a hard day’s work, a hot bath after a tough gym session, or maybe it’s just sitting outside in the sun with a good book. Whatever you love to do, brainstorm some ideas and keep a list handy for when you’re craving to feel good, but don’t want to fall back on food to fix your mood.</p>
<p><strong>5. Chuck out the cheeky stuff</strong></p>
<p>What food is your kryptonite? If it’s still in your house after surgery, get it out! You may not even be hungry, but trigger foods are too tempting to have around when you’re trying to lose weight. They may be your go-to when you’re feeling stressed or bored, but afterwards, you’ll feel disappointed in yourself for giving in. Be brutal. Just like those acid-wash jeans from the 80’s, they’ve got to go!</p>
<p><strong>6. Work it out!</strong></p>
<p>Getting out and moving is a fantastic way to kick-start healthy habits, metabolism and digestion. Exercise increases the release of serotonin, a hormone which aids in stress relief and can boost mood. Getting your body moving for even half an hour a day can lower blood pressure, increase bone and muscle strength, help with sleep and even up your energy levels! Getting off the tram or train one stop early, walking to and from the office, or cycling can be a great way to still go about your normal life with the bonus of incidental exercise.</p>
<p><strong>7. <em>“Walking with a friend in the dark is better than walking alone in the light.”</em>  Helen Keller.</strong></p>
<p>Post-surgery is a very vulnerable, scary time, with a lot of unknowns. Turn to the people who love and encourage you no matter what. Trust in your loved ones, surgeon, dietitian, GP or psychologist. These people are there to care for you you through it all, and it is crucial to get all of the right support and medical advice. Be entirely open with them, so they can help you through all these big changes. Challenging yourself is a whole lot easier when you’ve got people standing by you when things get tough.</p>
<p><strong>Written by guest blogger, <em>Alex Sherman</em></strong></p>

  • Australian Medical Association
  • Royal Australian College of Surgeons
  • University of Oxford
  • Alpha Omega Alpha